Beginner's Guide to the

Craft Yarn Council of America Knitted Sampler Afghan

Pattern 22 - Blister Check or Coin Stitch Pattern

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This page created June 25, 2009.

Table of Contents

CYCA Version
My Version - with abbreviations
Pattern in Chart form
Comments

The right side

The wrong side

The pattern as provided by the CYCA

With Color B cast on 49 stitches and knit 1 Row.

  • Row 1: (wrong side) With B purl.
  • Rows 2 and 4: With C knit.
  • Rows 3 and 5: With C purl.
  • Row 6: With B knit 2, * drop next stitch from needle and unravel 4 Rows down, picking up the B stitch from Row 1 below, insert needle into this stitch and under the 4 loose strands of C and knit catching the 4 loose strands behind stitch, knit 3 * . Repeat between * * until 2 stitches remain, knit 2.
  • Row 7: With B purl.
  • Rows 8 and 10: With C knit.
  • Rows 9 and 11: With C purl.
  • Row 12: With B knit 4, drop next stitch, unravel and knit B stitch from 5th Row below as in Row 6, knit 3 * . Repeat between * * until 1 stitch remains, knit 1.
  • Repeat Rows 1-12 for pattern until piece measures 11 from beginning. Bind off.

My version of the pattern with my abbreviations

I am inventing a new abbreviation to be used in this pattern:

  • Drop Knit: Drop next stitch from needle and unravel 4 Rows down, picking up the B stitch from Row 1 below, insert needle into this stitch and under the 4 loose strands of C and knit catching the 4 loose strands behind stitch

With Color B cast on 49 stitches.

  • Foundation Row: With B K.
  • Begin Pattern
  • Row 1: (wrong side) With B P.
  • Row 2: With C K.
  • Row 3: With C P.
  • Row 4: With C K.
  • Row 5: With C P.
  • Row 6: With B K 2, (Drop Knit, K 3) across, ending with K 2 instead of K 3.
  • Row 7: With B P.
  • Row 8: With C K.
  • Row 9: With C P.
  • Row 10: With C K.
  • Row 11: With C P.
  • Row 12: With B K 4, (Drop Knit, K 3) across, ending with K 4 instead of K 3.
  • Repeat Rows 1-12 for pattern until piece measures 11 from beginning. Bind off.

The pattern in chart form

The chart has a non-standard symbol - the "D" is used for the Drop Knit stitch described above.

This chart shows the two colours (Blue = B in the pattern, Red = C)

Comments on this pattern

This is a two-colour pattern that has a bit of similarity to Mosaic Knitting, but is sufficiently different that it is its own topic.

The fabric is basically stockinette or stocking stitch - knit 1 row, purl 1 row - something that you probably learned in your first knitting lesson.

The first thing that makes it a bit more complicated than what you learned in that first lesson is that there are two colours involved - one of them is used for 4 consecutive rows, and the other for 2.

If it were 2 rows of one colour and 2 rows of the other, then it is easy to handle the yarns. Work the two rows, and when you are ready to work the next row, just pick up the other yarn and start to knit. The new yarn will just snuggle up against the ends of the rows in the old colour. Just make sure that you leave enough length for that snuggling - if you make it too tight, your fabric will warp, and if you make it too loose, you will have blobs of yarn at the ends, and the fabric could unravel a bit. Make the snuggling feel natural!

But with a 4-row block of colour, you have to do one more step to keep the yarn snuggling against the end. After the first two rows of this colour, twist the two colours - wrap the current colour around the old colour, to help keep it snuggled.

The second complicated part of this pattern is what makes it really interesting. You are going to DROP STITCHES (aaacccckkkkk!!!!!) - deliberately - and safely! In the course of doing this pattern, you might end up losing at least a bit of the fear of dropping stitches.

First, here is a photo of what the fabric looks like just before the Drop Knit row (row 6 or 12). It is plain stocking stitch for a few rows below the needle. Easy knitting.

A side note: it was when I saw that wide coral band that really doesn't look like it belongs there that I decided to make sure that I ended the square on a green section, after the Drop Knits.

This photo shows that I have dropped the stitch, and it has started to form the ladder that is characteristic of a dropped stitch. Two dropped threads are visible, and the stitch is just poking out a bit.

This photo shows that I have dropped the stitch one row further down - 3 threads are in the ladder. There is still one more stitch to drop.

In this photo, the stitch has been dropped through the 4 coral rows, and now the right-hand needle is catching the bottom stitch. This stitch is NOT going to be dropped. It's a really key stitch - the safety stitch.

Still working with the right-hand needle in the safety stitch, insert it under all of those ladder threads.

This photo shows what it looks like from the wrong side at this stage.

The needle is in the back, ready to have the new yarn (green in this photo) wrapped around it, and then pulled through that safety stitch to the front. You are knitting INTO the safety stitch and AROUND all those dropped threads.

When I was working this square, I started by putting that safety stitch back onto the left-hand needle, so that it would feel like a normal stitch. But if I did that, I also had to place all of the dropped threads onto the left-hand needle as well, and make sure to knit through all of them. In the end, it just seemed easier to just leave the safety stitch on the right-hand needle until I had pulled the new yarn through it. But when you are working this square, do it the way it works for you.

This last photo shows the Drop Knit and the next three knit stitches complete, and all ready to do the next Drop Knit.

Notice how the staggered Drop Knit stitches make a hexagonal type of pattern. It is definitely an interesting stitch pattern.

Try it

The 12-row pattern was really easy to memorize, especially since most of it is plain stocking stitch.

There is some strong side curl in the fabric, and a lot of yarns being carried in the back. So I would not use it for something like a scarf (unless it was a tubular scarf). It would make a nice sweater, or even a nice yoke on a sweater. A hat would work, too, because the wrong side would not be exposed.

Try this square. It is pretty easy.

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Copyright 2009 Judith Obee